Literary criticism

Who was your first reader?

In most writers are hidden the stories of their struggle and how their talent–of writing– evolved, got recognised and flourished. Two hundred percent, every writer will become nostalgic about the precious moments from their childhood, of how a cousin of theirs suddenly, without their permission, got onto the scribblings hidden in their satchel. Do the memories float in your mind how he read them, liked them, appreciated them and circulated the word among the relatives? We are sure that they are precious.

It is a common thing to face the ire of a few people in the family. Many deride you, demoralise you and adFirst readervise you to focus on your studies rather than putting down your creativity on the papers. A plethora of weird advices is something that all of us have waded through to become writers, storytellers or poets.

That is the first step in the journey a writer who has miles to go, ordeals to pass and seasons of terrible weather to experience. But this first step is dear to everyone of us. We all like to keep these memories–of our first reader–intact to our heart. The first reader is not a mere figure from our past who came and went by. But he/she is a symbol of first success–the success that reflected in his/her interest in our writing. Our first reader plays a vital role in our careers. Had he not felt interested, we probably would not write more. It is he who guides us through the tough times and calls on us secretly–through memories–to continue our toil on the computer or the papers with words unless our success comes knocking our doors.

Our first reader–whosoever he/she was–is a person who recognised a writer in us, though stupid at that point of time. Through this writeup, we at The Literary Yard wish to pay tribute to the first readers of the world. The first reader often goes into the history unnoticed. However, his role is equally important.

Would you like to share your story of a first reader? We want to listen to it.

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Categories: Literary criticism

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